News Releases

News Release | Environment New York

Mayor DeBlasio cuts pollution through improved building efficiency

Today, New York City Mayor Bill DeBlasio announced new policies that will require building owners to sharply cut emissions of the pollution that causes global warming. The policies will require the 14,500 least efficient buildings in the city to upgrade their energy performance by 2030. These buildings are responsible for almost a quarter of the city’s climate-changing pollution. The city calls it “the most ambitious program of its kind in the nation.” Heather Leibowitz, State Director of Environment New York, issued the following statement praising the step forward:

News Release | Environment New York

STATEMENT SUPPORTING HISTORIC PROPOSAL TO PROTECT DELAWARE RIVER

Today, the regional multi-state agency (the Delaware River Basin Commission, DRBC) charged with preserving and restoring the Delaware River, its tributaries and watershed made a historic announcement for protecting this important local waterway by proposing to ban the oil and gas drilling practice known as “fracking” within the Delaware River Basin.

“Expanding and implementing this ban on fracking and fracking activities is crucial for the residents of New York,” stated Heather Leibowitz Director of Environment New York. “Millions of New Yorkers rely on the Delaware River for our drinking water supply—we have to guarantee that we protect this source water from the pollution threats posed by fracking, and today’s announcement is a crucial step forward in ensuring that guarantee.”

News Release | Environment New York

New “back to school” item for parents: toolkit to 'Get the Lead Out of schools’ drinking water

With “back to school” in full swing this week, Environment New York today offered a new toolkit to help parents, teachers, and administrators Get the Lead Out of schools’ drinking water.  Citing a lack of accurate information on lead contamination in water and how schools should prevent it, Environment New York is encouraging parents and teachers to put the new toolkit on their “back to school” reading list. 

“Our kids deserve safe drinking water at school,” said Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York.  “We want to give parents, teachers, and school administrators the tools they need to ‘get the lead out.’” 

News Release | Environment New York Research and Policy Center

Pollution would get worse for Delaware River with budget cuts, new report says

Proposed cuts to EPA clean water programs would halt progress on addressing local pollution in the Delaware River, according to a new report released today.  With a deadline for Congress to approve a federal budget fast approaching, Environment New York is calling for full funding of EPA to protect the Delaware River and other New York waterways. “With progress in cleaning up the Delaware River, New Yorkers have just enjoyed a summer of fishing and swimming,” said Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York. “Cutting EPA’s clean water programs would put that progress at risk.”

News Release | Environment New York Research and Policy Center

Ten Years of Progress Positions New York to Take Renewable Energy to the Next Level

Since 2007, New York has seen a 6,548% increase in the amount of electricity it gets from the sun and a 473% increase in wind power production, according to a new report released today by Environment New York Research & Policy Center. The report also highlights advances in the use of energy storage and electric vehicles that will help catalyze the clean energy revolution in New York. At the same time, New York ranked 9th for improvements in electricity energy efficiency programs.   “Every day, we see more evidence that an economy powered by renewable energy is within our reach,” said Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York. “The progress we’ve made in the last decade on renewable energy and technologies like battery storage and electric cars should give New Yorkers the confidence that we can take clean energy to the next level.”

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