Stop Fracking Our Future

Stop Fracking Our Future

Across the country, fracking is contaminating drinking water, making nearby families sick with air pollution, and turning forest acres into industrial zones. Yet the oil and gas industry is pushing to expand this dirty drilling — to new states and even near critical drinking water supplies for millions of Americans.

We need to show massive public support to stop the oil and gas industry from fracking our future.

Credit: Sam Malone

Fracking is threatening our environment and health

As fracking booms across the nation, it is creating a staggering array of threats to our environment and health: 

Our drinking water

There are already more than 1,000 documented cases of water contamination from fracking operations — from toxic wastewater, well blowouts, chemical spills and more. Moreover, fracking uses millions of gallons of water.

Yet the oil and gas industry wants to bring fracking to places like the Delaware River Basin, which provides drinking water for 15 million people, and Otero Mesa, which hosts the largest untapped aquifer in parched New Mexico.

Credit: B. Mark Schmerling

Our forests and parks

Our national parks and national forests are the core of America’s natural heritage. Yet federal officials are considering leases for fracking on the outskirts of Mesa Verde National Monument, along the migration corridor for Grand Teton’s pronghorn antelope, and right inside several of our national forests.

Along with air and water pollution, fracking would degrade these beautiful places with wellpads, waste pits, compressors, pipelines, noisy machinery and thousands of truck trips. 

Credit: National Energy Technology Laboratory

Our health 

Families living on the frontlines of fracking have suffered nausea, headaches, rashes, dizziness and other illnesses. Some doctors are calling these reported incidents "the tip of the iceberg."

We must act now to stop the damage of dirty drilling

In April 2016, we released our report, "Fracking By The Numbers," which looks at the damage to our water, land and climate from a decade of dirty drilling. The report concludes that to address the environmental and public health threats from fracking across the nation, states should prohibit fracking. No plausible system of regulation appears likely to address the scale and severity of fracking’s impacts.

In places where fracking does continue to take place:

  • Fracking should be subject to all relevant environmental laws. Federal policymakers must close the loopholes exempting fracking from key provisions of our nation’s environmental laws.
  • Our most important natural areas should be kept off limits. Federal officials should ban fracking on our public lands, including national parks, national forests, and sources of drinking water.
  • The oil and gas industry — not taxpayers, communities or families — should pay the costs of damage caused by fracking. Policymakers should require robust financial assurance from fracking operators at every well site.
  • The public’s right to know about fracking’s environmental damage must be respected. More complete data on fracking should be collected and made available to the public, enabling us to understand the full extent of the harm that fracking causes to our environment and health.

Issue updates

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Bad Oil Export Vote in the House

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News Release | Environment New York

Cuomo Administration Takes Next Step in Making Fracking Ban

Today New York State Department of Environmental Conservation released the long awaiting Supplemental Generic Environmental Impact Statement, an environmental review which lays the groundwork for the statewide fracking ban.

A statement from Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York, follows:

"Governor Cuomo listened carefully to the latest science and the voices of millions of New Yorkers when he decided to permanently protect the water, health, and environment of the Empire State from the documented damage of dirty drilling. This is what true leadership looks like.  

We are looking forward to reviewing the impact statement in greater depth, but it seems to encompass what the governor promised. We welcome this critical step in the process toward finalizing New York’s fracking ban once and for all.”

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News Release | Environment New York

Representatives honor Earth Day with bill to protect public lands from fracking

Today in honor of Earth Day, Representatives Pocan (WI) and Schakowsky (IL) introduced the Protect Our Public Lands Act (POPLA), the first ever Congressional effort to ban fracking on public lands, which would protect precious areas from Florida’s Everglades to New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon. 
 

The Introduction of POPLA comes just one month after the administration released rules regulating fracking on public lands.
 

“We’ve seen fracking contaminate our drinking water, put our families’ health at risk and turn treasured open spaces into industrial zones,” said Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York. “Some places are just too precious to drill and frack, and that includes our parks, canyons and forests.”
 

 

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News Release | Environment New York Research and Policy Center

Report: Small or large, all fracking companies break rules

From Fortune 500 companies like Cabot Oil, to mom-and-pop operators, to firms like Chevron who tout their clean records, virtually all frackers are prone to infractions of environmental rules, a new report says. The analysis of Pennsylvania’s oil and gas industry over a four-year period found that the top offenders of air, water, and health protections averaged more than a violation each day.

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